The Power of Attorney process.


If you need someone to act on your behalf you might choose to grant them Power of Attorney. This could be because you’re going away‚ or perhaps you find it difficult to do everyday tasks‚ like go to the bank. The person acting on your behalf is known as your “Donee”‚ but their legal powers will only remain for as long as you’re mentally capable of making your own decisions. If you want to prepare for the longer term‚ you’ll need something more permanent in place: a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA).



LPA can potentially grant more legal powers than an EPA and is more flexible too


LPA’s replaced Enduring Powers of Attorney (EPA)‚ but the latter are still perfectly valid as long as they were signed before 1st October 2007. There are two types of LPA:


1. Property and Financial Affairs

2. Health and Welfare


By granting Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) your Donee will able to carry on acting on your behalf even if your mental capacity is impaired (for example through an accident or illness). An LPA can potentially grant more legal powers than an EPA and is more flexible too: you can specify exactly what powers you’d like your Donee to have.



The next step


For a free discussion, contact us today on 01663 733 431 or fill out our email form.



You can specify exact what powers you'd like your Donee to have.

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